;

Keeping football free from doping

There is no place for doping in sport today and FIFA is continuously striving to keep football free from doping and lead by example to safeguard the future success and sustainability of football around the world. Member associations and confederations are key collaborators in the global fight against doping.

FIFA introduced regular doping controls in 1966 to ensure that the results of matches in its international calendar were a fair reflection of the strength of the contenders. FIFA was therefore one of the first international sports governing bodies to acknowledge the problem and introduce active measures to combat it.

FIFA works hand in hand with the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and National Anti-Doping Organisations (NADOs) in the much-needed worldwide collaboration to protect the health of athletes and the spirit of fair competition to better coordinate efforts for a more efficient global testing strategy, ensure the harmonised applications of the rules and provide adequate education to all stakeholders.

FIFA’s strict Anti-Doping Regulations establish the provisions for testing and sanctions, which apply to all football competitions worldwide. The Regulations are in line with WADA’s World Anti-Doping Code, “the core document that harmonises anti-doping policies, rules and regulations within sport organisations and among public authorities around the world.” One of the main pillars of FIFA’s anti-doping strategy is prevention through education. Information sessions on anti-doping are conducted during the final tournaments of all FIFA youth competitions and players are encouraged to take FIFA’s anti-doping knowledge test.

Testing strategy
Testing strategy

Testing strategy

FIFA directly handles the anti-doping programmes for all FIFA competitions, so any player participating in a FIFA competition may be required to undergo a doping control at any time.

Therapeutic use exemptions
Therapeutic use exemptions

Therapeutic use exemptions

Athletes may have illnesses or conditions that require them to take particular medication. If the medication an athlete is required to take to treat an illness or condition happens to fall under the Prohibited List, a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) may give that athlete the authorisation to take the needed medicine.

Say no to doping and report offences
Say no to doping and report offences

Say no to doping and report offences

Keep football free from doping – anyone who has witnessed an anti-doping violation being committed, or who has reasonable grounds to believe that doping has taken place in football, should use FIFA’s Doping Reporting Mechanism tool.

;

See also

Say No To Doping - FIFA educational tool

See also

FIFA Anti-Doping report 2019/20

Useful links