World Football

The Week in Quotes

Portrait of Ronaldo of Brazil during the Germany v Brazil
© Getty Images

"I’m really hoping that we start seeing something like NHS Panini stickers. That’d be awesome – they deserve to be celebrated."
England goalkeeper Karen Bardsley comes up with a great suggestion to celebrate NHS workers in an interview with The Guardian

"Fortunately I haven’t had to hand out any yellow or red cards in my pharmacy just yet."
Referee Riem Hussein on her full-time job as a pharmacist, speaking in the first of our 'Women in Football' series

"When I was a kid, I looked up to Michael Owen. I’ve always said it. I liked him because he’s small. He had the number 10 just like in my club and he played as a forward. So I told myself if a small player like him is doing well in the Premier league then I could make it too. Imagine that I was only a kid. I was nine-ten years old."
Manchester City striker Sergio Aguero tells Thierry Henry who his footballing idol was on Instagram Live

"Everyone was talking about my injury. When I arrived in training with this hairstyle, it stopped. So I had my peace of mind and could focus on rehab. I was not really proud of my strange haircut, but it was a good way to change the subject."
Ronaldo speaks with kicker about his famous hairstyle at the 2002 World Cup

"A mistake on the pitch maybe leads to a goal. A mistake in my new team, it's going to be lives. I know I've got to be the best version of me every single day to help keep Merseyside safe, and that excites me."
Former England youth international Paige Williams speaks with BBC Sport about starting her career with Merseyside Fire and Rescue Service

"As a person, he's a great guy, and as a player even better because he holds himself to the highest of standards and he holds his team-mates to those standards. His public persona is very different to the way he is behind closed doors."
AC Milan goalkeeper Asmir Begovic on Zlatan Ibrahimovic in an interview with Sky Sports

"It's a very good product, the women's game. It needs time to grow. But when you post about women's football, the abuse and sexism the players get is abhorrent. It's terrible. With the women's game I'm going to champion it because I've got two girls myself who are looking to play."
Ian Wright speaks out against the abuse women's footballers get on social media in an interview on BBC 5 Live

"As a coach, for my team I would choose Ronaldinho at his best over Messi. I shared a year with Ronaldinho and he is a different player – he's touched by God."
Martin Cardetti on Ronaldinho speaking with Crack Deportivo

"I keep on saying to everybody we were competitors, wanting to win and would do anything to win, competing against Man united but the hardest thing ever was to train. The training session, you saw what we did and what we didn’t do. All you are facing is Sol Campbell, [Martin] Keown, Kolo [Toure], every morning, That is what I had to deal with every morning and they had to deal with us. It was so hard in training. Sometimes we would fight in training, battle. It makes me laugh when you hear "oh we argued" but it was meant to happen."
Thierry Henry on 'The Invincibles' team of Arsenal in the 2003/04 Premier League season, speaking on Sky Sports

"I wake up early. I never stay up late. Get up, train, eat, sleep. Even on holiday, by the end of the week I need to train. Football is my life; I take it very seriously. I’ve felt like a professional player since I was five years old. I don’t know how to be any different."
Manchester United midfielder Nemanja Matic talks about his footballing journey in an online Q&A for charity

"Manuel Neuer changed the game completely, probably back in about 2010 at the World Cup. He had been playing as a sweeper keeper before but it was something completely new to see it to that extent for Bayern Munich and for Germany. Both his coaches, Joachim Low and Pep Guardiola; they utilised the fact that he was brave enough to do that. And they utilised that by getting their counter-press so effective because they knew any time they lost the ball, they could counter-press so hard and if they didn’t get a ball in over the top, Neuer was there to sweep and get play going again high up the pitch. He very much changed the game and changed the expectation of what’s required from goalkeepers."
Kasper Schmeichel talks about the finer points of goalkeeping with The Athletic

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