“Listen Up! The Official 2010 FIFA World Cup™ Album”, featuring iconic chart-topping hits such as Shakira’s Waka Waka (This Time for Africa), has raised over $2.5 million USD for African causes through the worldwide sales of the album and its singles.

The majority of the proceeds from the project – in excess of $2.3m USD – haves been designated by Sony Music, the artists featured on the album and FIFA to be contributed to “20 Centres for 2010”, the official campaign of the 2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™. The remainder of the proceeds has been donated to various other charitable causes within Africa.

Shakira, who’s Waka Waka single sold over three million copies all over the world, reaching No1 in 15 markets, reflected on her work with FIFA, saying: “My experience in the last two FIFA World Cups taught me not only the enormous significance of football, and the passion it generates in so many millions of people, but also gave me the opportunity to see first-hand the incredible social work that FIFA is involved in”.

“I had the pleasure to work with FIFA promoting universal education through the 1Goal campaign as well as through FIFA's 20 Centres for 2010 initiative.”

“20 Centres for 2010” was initiated by FIFA in order to encourage positive social change in disadvantaged communities across Africa by building 20 Football for Hope Centres for education, public health and football. The centres help to promote social and human development through football long after the 2010 FIFA World Cup™, leaving a tangible social legacy for the continent.

“We are delighted that this additional extensive investment into the legacy project of the FIFA World Cup is bringing change to disadvantaged communities across Africa. Sony has already been an invaluable partner for many of our social projects, and we are very glad to continue this collaboration,” said Federico Addiechi, Head of FIFA Corporate Social Responsibility.

Seven of the 20 Centres have already been completed in South Africa, Namibia, Kenya, Mali, Lesotho, Rwanda and Ghana, with the remainder of the centres set to be finished by the end of 2013.