Bigger than the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, Germany, the Stade De France in France and the Yokohama International Stadium in Japan, Soccer City is one of the largest stadiums to host a 2010 FIFA World Cup™.

Nearing 90 per cent complete, with work on the precinct already well under way, and the pitch laid, the sheer size and scale of the stadium awed experts from FIFA and the 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee South Africa (OC) as the recent FIFA stadium inspection tour culminated at the gates of Soccer City.

The opening and closing ceremony will be here and we believe that the eyes of the world will see South Africa though this facility and will truly represent what South Africa is all about - in a calabash around a fire

Sibongile Mazibuko, Executive Director 2010, City of Johannesburg

"It is changing the skyline of Johannesburg for the better. We believe this particular facility will be one of the icons of the city like the Nelson Mandela Bridge, and the Apartheid and Hector Peterson museums and be a tourist attraction for years to come," said Sibongile Mazibuko, Executive Director 2010 from the City of Johannesburg.

"The opening and closing ceremony will be here and we believe that the eyes of the world will see South Africa though this facility and will truly represent what South Africa is all about - in a calabash around a fire."

In Africa, the calabash is used for cooking food, traditionally over a fire. It is socially synonymous with family time, entertaining friends and sharing stories.

A remarkable aspect of the renovations of the stadium, over and above the 80 000 cubic metres of concrete that will have been poured, the 9 000 tons of reinforcing steel and 8 000 tons of structural steel that would have been erected, are the ten vertical slots that are aligned geographically with the nine other 2010 stadiums and the Olympic Stadium in Berlin, representing the road to 2010.