Roja, Oranje provide numbers aplenty
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FIFA.com gives you the numbers behind the action on a night when Spain won the biggest prize in football at the expense of the Netherlands.

116

minutes were on the clock when Andres Iniesta scored the latest winning goal in a FIFA World Cup™ Final.

32

years ago was the last time an extra-time goal was scored in the decider. Coincidentally, the Netherlands suffered it when Argentina scored the second of two extra-time goals to seal a 3-1 win.

6

Finals have gone into extra time, with 2006 and 2010 being the only time it has happened in consecutive FIFA World Cups. The other four deciders to feature extra time were in 1934, 1966, 1978 and 1994.

5

European teams have now won the FIFA World Cup, and each did it in their first trip to the concluding match. Before Spain’s triumph in South Africa, Italy had won their first Final in 1934, West Germany in 1954, England in 1966, and France in 1998.

4

of Spain’s four knockout matches ended in 1-0 wins for the Iberians. This makes them the first team ever to keep clean sheets in all four of their knockout matches en route to the Trophy. Germany had previously won three consecutive knockout matches by a 1-0 margin in 2002, before eventually losing 2-0 to Brazil in the Final.

3

runners-up finishes at the FIFA World Cup now belong to the Dutch - an unwanted outright record for a country never to have won the tournament. The Netherlands, silver medalists in 1974 and 1978, had shared that dubious distinction with Hungary (1938, 1954) and Czechoslovakia (1934, 1962) going into tonight's Final at Soccer City.

2

goals conceded by Spain – to Switzerland’s Gelson Fernandez and Chile’s Rodrigo Millar – equals the joint-fewest allowed in a FIFA World Cup by the winning team. They now share that record with France (1998) and Italy (2006).

2

reigning European champions have lifted the FIFA World Cup Trophy. Spain, winners of UEFA EURO 2008, were the first to accomplish this feat since West Germany won the 1974 world finals after conquering Europe in 1972.

1

side finished South Africa 2010 without suffering defeat – and it was not the world champions, who lost their opening group match 1-0 to Switzerland. It was actually New Zealand, who enjoy this improbable honour thanks to draws with Slovakia, Italy and Paraguay.

0

teams had previously won the FIFA World Cup after losing their opening group match. Spain did it by defeating the Netherlands, who are the only team to have won the UEFA European Championship after losing their first match.