Tokyo, 1964

The football tournament added another tier as the second-place team in each of the four groups also qualified for the quarter-finals.

Even before the opening kick-off, the 1964 event was marred because 328 people were killed during rioting at a qualifying match between Peru and Argentina in Lima. The riot turned out to be the start of one problem after another as Korea DPR dropped out after some of their track and swimming athletes were suspended for competing in some unsanctioned games.

Italy also decided not to participate after they were accused of housing several professional football players. There were members of the Italian Olympic team who also played for Inter, who defeated Real Madrid in the European Cup final.

The football competition definitely had its moments. For the first time in Olympic history, two African teams -- Ghana and Egypt -- reached the quarter-finals. The Egyptians prevailed over Ghana, 5-1. Egypt were eliminated in the semi-finals, losing to Hungary in the wake of Ferenc Bene's four-goal effort in a 6-0 result.

But that was not Bene's most impressive performance as he finished with a tournament-high 12 goals, collecting a remarkable six goals in a 6-0 first-round triumph over Morocco. Hungary struck for another six goals in a wild, 6-5 win over a strong Yugoslav side four days later as Tibor Csernai had four goals and Bene one. In a rather undistinguished Olympic final, Hungary won its second gold medal, edging Czechoslovakia, 2-1, on defender Vladimir Weiss's own goal and Bene's score in front of 65,610 in the National Stadium.

In the bronze-medal match, East German captured their first football medal, defeating Egypt, 3-1.