Amsterdam, 1928

If there was any doubt about Uruguay's prowess at the 1924 Summer Games, it was all but dispelled four years later, as the South Americans captured their second successive crown. The Uruguayans were led by eight returnees from the 1924 squad, including Andrade, Jose Nasazzi, and Hector Scarone.

There were a number of memorable matches, particularly by the Italians. They managed to edge France, 4-3, in an opening-round offensive showcase, then defeated Spain, 7-1 in a quarter-final replay after a 1-1 draw. Italy finally succumbed to eventual champions Uruguay in the semi-finals, 3-2, as Pedro Cea, Antonio Campolo and Scarone got the goals.

Argentina, along with Chile and Uruguay comprising a South American trio, romped past the United States in the first round, 11-2, as Roberto Cherro collected three goals and Domingo Tarasconi four, Belgium in the quarter-finals, and Egypt, 6-0 in the semi-finals. Tarasconi finished as tournament scoring leader with eleven goals.

The Uruguayans, while not as spectacular, proved to be as efficient, stopping the Netherlands, 2-0, Germany, 4-1, and Italy, 3-2, in the semi-finals.

In the first all-South-American final in Olympic history, Argentina and Uruguay played to a 1-1 draw. Three days later, in a replay officiated by a Dutchman (remember 1924?), Uruguay, using five fresh players, prevailed, thanks to a counter-attack goal by Scarone. Roberto Figueroa also tallied for the champions, while Luis Monti, who would perform for Argentina in the 1930 World Cup before joining the Italian National Team for the 1934 World Cup, scored for Argentina.

Only two years later, these two teams would meet in the finals of another international competition -- the very first World Cup -- in Montevideo, with the home team winning to cap off an amazing hat-trick of prestigious football titles over a six-year span.

The bronze medal was won by Italy, who rolled to an 11-3 win over Egypt as Angelo Schiavio, Elvio Banchero and Mario Magnozzi pulled off a football rarity -- a hat-trick of hat-tricks.