Records, red mist and penalty pain
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Serial record-breakers Lionel Messi and Bayern Munich star in FIFA.com’s latest stats review, which also highlights a speedy red card in Colombia, a trio of penalties at Old Trafford and a dominant force in Greece.

371

Barcelona goals is the club’s new all-time record, and the man holding that record is Lionel Messi. The Argentinian surpassed Paulino Alcantara’s long-standing benchmark of 369, set in 1927, with a hat-trick in Barça’s 7-0 thrashing of Osasuna on Sunday. It was Messi’s 25th treble for the club, his first since September, and left him just one goal short of joining Hugo Sanchez as the highest-scoring foreigner in Spanish La Liga history. With 233 league goals already to his name, Messi is now the leading active marksman in any of Europe’s top five leagues, with Francesco Totti (232) having been surpassed over the weekend. His exploits against Osasuna capped a week of broken records for Barça’s No10, who on Wednesday had moved on to 67 UEFA Champions League goals, surpassing Raul’s single-club record with Real Madrid (66).

85

successive English Premier League games without conceding a penalty was the record run that came to a spectacular end for Manchester United on Sunday. Having gone so long without being penalised, the Red Devils conceded three spot-kicks within the space of 43 minutes, two of which were converted by Steven Gerrard in a 3-0 Liverpool victory. It was only the third time in Premier League history that a team has faced three penalties in a single game, and helped consign United to a fifth league defeat at Old Trafford this season – equal to their number of home losses in the previous three campaigns combined. Liverpool, meanwhile, are now the only team yet to lose a Premier League match in 2014 and, with 76 goals for the season, have already scored more than the final tallies of 43 past English champions.

50

successive German Bundesliga matches without defeat was the landmark reached by Bayern Munich on Saturday. In doing so, the German champions became just the second team in any of Europe’s traditional big five leagues – the other being AC Milan – to reach the half-century mark. Currently, no team in any of the world's top flights comes anywhere close to Bayern’s run, with the next-best one on show in the Maldives, where New Radiant have gone 38 games unbeaten. Bayer Leverkusen, the last team to beat Bayern in the Bundesliga, became the latest to succumb on Saturday, with the Bavarians setting a new division record by scoring two or more goals in 17 consecutive matches. The 2-1 victory was also their 17th win on the bounce – yet another Bundesliga record.

27

seconds were on the clock at Medellin’s Atanasio Girardot stadium when Atletico Nacional’s Alejandro Bernal picked up the fastest red card in Copa Libertadores history. A stamp on the ankle of Maximiliano Calzada, who was representing Nacional of Uruguay, earned the Colombian his marching orders and eclipsed a 40-year-old tournament record. That had been set in 1974, when Rosario Central’s Jorge Gonzalez was sent off after just 30 seconds against Huracan. Yet despite losing Bernal so early in this encounter, Atletico Nacional went on to salvage a point against their Uruguayan namesakes, coming from two goals down to snatch a 2-2 draw.

16

of the last 18 Greek championships have now been won by Olympiacos after they added to their impressive haul on Saturday. This latest title was the Piraeus outfit’s fourth in succession and 41st overall, more than double the number claimed by their closest challengers, Panathinaikos (20). In fact, no club in mainland Europe has won more domestic titles than Olympiacos, with Rapid Vienna following on 33 (32 Austrian and one German), and Ajax, Anderlecht, Benfica, Real Madrid and Sparta Prague all on 32. Worryingly for their Greek rivals, the Τhrylos secured their latest championship with some ease, crossing the finishing line with five matches to spare. They also boast a goal difference of +67, leaving them 39 better off than their nearest challengers.