Titles, triumphs and penalty pain
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In our latest stats review, FIFA.com looks over impressive records for Spain and Germany at UEFA EURO 2012, a depressing theme for England, title joy in Argentina, and a long-awaited final for a Brazilian giant.

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minutes without conceding was the mark at which Corinthians keeper Cassio was finally beaten in the Copa Libertadores last Thursday, with Neymar the man to end his resistance. Yet despite the Santos star’s goal, his 27th in as many competitive appearances – a tally which rose to 28 in 28 at the weekend – it was O Timão who were celebrating at the end. A 1-1 draw enabled the Sao Paulo outfit to qualify for the first Libertadores final of their 102-year history, a match in which they will face a Boca Juniors side aiming for a record-equalling seventh continental title. Corinthians’ success thus far has been built on a sturdy defence and, the semi-final aside, imperious home form. Indeed, Neymar’s goal was the first they had conceded in the tournament at their Pacaembu stadium, with six matches there producing an aggregate scoreline of 14-1.

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different clubs have now been crowned Argentinian champions after Arsenal became the latest on Sunday. Founded as recently as 1957, the Sarandi outfit are comfortably the youngest of their country’s top-flight teams, and had never finished higher than third prior to this season. However, a 1-0 win over a Belgrano side who picked two red and five yellow cards, combined with a 2-2 draw for joint-leaders Tigre against Independiente, enabled Arsenal to create a little piece of history. Ironically though, most eyes in Argentina were focused on the division below, where record champions River Plate were securing their return to the Primera Division at the first time of asking, 362 days on from their shock relegation. The scorer of both goals in Los Millonarios' title-clinching 2-0 win over Almirante Brown was David Trezeguet, whose tally of 13 has established him as the highest scorer in the second round of Nacional B fixtures.

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successive competitive victories was the new world record set by Germany with their 4-2 triumph over Greece on Friday. This latest win took them beyond the benchmark of 14 they shared with Spain and the Netherlands, and was achieved with ease in a match in which they enjoyed 78 per cent of possession – the highest share recorded by any team thus far at EURO 2012. Miroslav Klose also found himself among the goals, and as well as becoming the third German – after Jurgen Klinsmann and Rudi Voller – to score in at least five major tournaments, he moved to within one goal of Gerd Muller’s record haul of 18 at FIFA World Cups and European Championships. Germany are, however, likely to find it considerably tougher against Italy, a nation they have never beaten in seven attempts at major tournaments. The semi-final also pits the team (Germany) with most goals (9) and fewest shots (51) of those remaining at EURO 2012 against the side with most shots (77) and fewest goals (4).

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years and 364 days have now passed since Spain conceded a goal in the knockout phase of either the EURO or the FIFA World Cup. Not since Zinedine Zidane scored a stoppage-time clincher in France’s 3-1 win over La Roja at Germany 2006 has Iker Casillas been beaten in the latter stages of either competition, with the subsequent streak of eight clean sheets enabling him to set a new record. Ironically, Casillas’s latest shutout came not only against France, but on Zidane’s 40th birthday, and the same match witnessed Xavi surpass Zizou’s record tally of 707 successful passes at the EURO by raising his own tally to 734. The star of the show, however, was Xabi Alonso, who scored both goals and was responsible for all three of Spain’s efforts on target. It was the perfect way mark his 100th international appearance, with the Real Madrid midfielder becoming only the fifth Spanish centurion after Casillas, Raul, Xavi and Andoni Zubizarreta.

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win in 7: that is England’s miserable record in penalty shootouts after they exited EURO 2012 in familiar fashion on Sunday. And the Three Lions’ record in quarter-final matches is scarcely any better. Indeed, England have been beaten in all but one of their nine last-eight encounters outside London, with a 3-2 win over Cameroon at Italy 1990 the sole exception. Heartbreaking as it was for them, none of Roy Hodgson’s men could claim that this latest shootout defeat was undeserved. Italy had, after all, attempted 36 shots to England’s nine, completed 744 passes to their opponents’ 269, and are now unbeaten in 14 competitive matches under Cesare Prandelli.