They said it: Jurgen Klopp
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Jurgen Klopp has long been afforded cult status among German football fans. The 44-year-old symbolises a new generation of coaches and enjoys enormous respect for his authentic, emotional and competent manner, not to mention his track record. Kloppo, as he is affectionately known by friends and colleagues, achieved the remarkable feat of leading a fresh-faced Borussia Dortmund side to the Bundesliga title last season, making pacey counter-attacks and slick passing his signature style.

The man who wrote his sport science thesis on the topic of 'Walking' and racked up 325 appearances for Mainz is renowned for his unique ability to put players at ease, always with the right mix of respect, humour and energy. Germany's Coach of the Year in 2011 approaches all his players equally and enjoys their total admiration as a result.

After leading Mainz from the wrong end of the second division into the Bundesliga in just seven years, Klopp was hired by Dortmund in 2008 and quickly won over the club's considerable fan base. A look back at some of his most famous quotes soon reveals why…

"Unfortunately I was never able to transfer what was in my head onto the pitch during my playing career. I had the talent for the regional leagues and the brain for the Bundesliga - so I ended up in the second division."
On his qualities as a defender

"My abilities were somewhat limited in comparison with his…"
On former Germany striker Jurgen Klinsmann

"I've had to put up with poor football for long enough - mainly my own."
On his ambitions as a coach as opposed to a player

"Maybe that was the case when I was 17 or 18."
When asked whether he was a 'one-night man' after temporarily taking over the leadership of the Bundesliga table with Dortmund early last season

"We're still encouraged to phone players directly. If we make their agents an offer, they usually think we're pulling their leg."
On Mainz's shoestring transfer policy

"If the fans want emotion and you give them a game of chess, one of you is going to have to find a new stadium. 60,000 Dortmund fans don't want to sit there twiddling their thumbs. They want to see passion!"
On the mentality of the Borussia Dortmund fans

"It doesn't make it any easier to run your heart out when you've just woken up in a five-star hotel. Too much comfort makes you comfortable."
On the 'difficulties' facing modern footballers

"When we last won in Munich, most of these players were still on breast milk."
Following Dortmund's first victory at Bayern Munich in almost 20 years

"We didn't practise with the heading pendulum. Unfortunately you can't set it that low."
After the diminutive Shinji Kagawa scored a header against Karpaty Lviv

"In extreme situations, you have to think fast. At one of my mates' stag parties, we all dressed up as Father Christmas - fully masked!"
On remaining discreet when out in public

"Sometimes I scare myself when I watch the pictures back on television."
On his extrovert and sometimes aggressive demeanour on the touchline

"Just because you're a bit tired, it doesn't mean you can boot your team-mates. They belong to the club!"
To his players after seeing some tough tackles fly in at the club's summer training camp

"If it smells of sweat in here, it's me. The match was just so exciting!"
Klopp to his Schalke counterpart Fred Rutten in the lift as they made their way to the post-match press conference following a 3-3 draw in 2008

"I don't really know how often I shave. There's no regular rhythm. I can't see myself in the mirror in the morning anyway - I'm too short-sighted."
The secret behind Klopp's ever-changing facial hair

"The same day you finally understand the game of football!"
In response to the question of when striker Nelson Valdez would finally leave the club

"Of course! I was a regular customer at the meat counter during the World Cup. I always picked up something for the barbecue."
When asked whether he still goes shopping

"I rejected all the offers because I'm a coach and I always want to be. Only certain sections of the public thought otherwise."
On a potential career as a television pundit