About the Event

FOOTBALL'S SPIRITUAL HOME

To call football an obsession in Brazil does not go close to describing the hold the beautiful game has on the nation.

Brazil has become the spiritual home of the game in the 90 years since the Brazilian Football Association (CBF) became affiliated to FIFA.

Since then, the national team or Seleção have won the FIFA World Cup™ five times and the Copa América eight times. In addition, there have been five FIFA U-20 World Cups, three FIFA U-17 World Cups, three FIFA Confederations Cups, five FIFA Futsal World Cups, four FIFA Beach Soccer World Cups and dozens of continental trophies. 

In the process of collecting all that silverware, the country has laid down a legacy built on pure footballing talent – talent that has become a byword for audacious brilliance and that remains the model for playing the game the “right way”. 

Brazil is far from being a one-trick nation, however. Brazilians are passionate about volleyball, basketball, tennis, Formula One and a host of other sports. The late, great racing driver Ayrton Senna, for instance, is revered as highly as any football player from any generation, while the country's passion for self-expression is never better demonstrated than when the spectacular carnival marks the beginning of Lent each year.

The largest country in South America, Brazil stretches over almost half of the continent, with its most densely-populated areas along the Atlantic coastlines, most notably in the two largest cities: São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Brazil has roughly 190 million inhabitants, making it the fifth most populated country on Earth.

The official language is Portuguese, although many Brazilians speak other languages according to their origins. German and Italian, for example, are fairly prevalent in the cities of the south - the other language shared by all Brazilians of course, is football.

Your Hosts

To call football an obsession in Brazil does not even go close to describing the hold that the beautiful game has on the hearts and minds of the nation.

Brazil has become the spiritual home of the game in the 90 years since the Brazilian Football Association (CBF) became affiliated to FIFA. 

Since then, the national team, or Selecao, have won the FIFA World Cup™ five times and the Copa America eight times. In addition, there have been five FIFA U-20 World Cups, three FIFA U-17 World Cups, three FIFA Confederations Cups, five FIFA Futsal World Cups, four FIFA Beach Soccer World Cups and dozens of continental trophies.  

In the process of collecting all that silverware, the country has laid down a legacy built on pure footballing talent – talent that has become a byword for audacious brilliance and that remains the model for playing the game the “right way”. 

Brazil is far from being a one-trick nation, however. Brazilians are passionate about volleyball, basketball, tennis, Formula One and a host of other sports. The late, great racing driver Ayrton Senna, for instance, is revered as highly as any football player from any generation, while the country's passion for self-expression is never better demonstrated than when the spectacular carnival marks the beginning of Lent each year.

The largest country in South America, Brazil stretches over almost half of the continent, with its most densely-populated areas along the Atlantic coastlines, most notably in the two largest cities: São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro. Brazil has roughly 190 million inhabitants, making it the fifth most populated country on Earth. 

The official language is Portuguese, although many Brazilians speak other languages according to their origins. German and Italian, for example, are fairly prevalent in the cities of the south - the other language shared by all Brazilians of course, is football.

Host Venues

  • 190 million

    people live in Brazil, making it the fifth most populated nation on Earth

Brazil's Big Day

Spain's all-time greatest challengers were expected to add the FIFA Confederations Cup trophy to their enviable collection at the Maracanã, but hosts Brazil did not just rip up the script, they did so with a swagger in their step.

Brazil's performance would surely have made the 1958 championsof Garrincha and Pelé, “The Beautiful Team” of 1970 and the Zico-headlined thrill machine of ’82 proud.

It took just two minutes for Fred's goal to make the Maracanã's decibel levels comparable to a NASA base at space-shuttle launch. Midway through the half, David Luiz somehow rocketed his big, burly frame back to make what was surely one of the greatest clearances in history (Pedro, whose shot he denied, even jogged up to the Chelsea centre-back at half-time to shower him with praise!).

Supernova

Neymar came of age in Brazil, exploding onto the world stage with each goal scored. 

Brazil gave a football lesson. They put on a show.

Ronaldo

 

Star of the tournament Neymar made it 2-0 on the stroke of the break, his vicious strike into the roof of the net, with his weaker left foot, further vindicating why Barcelona recently paid EUR 57 million for him.

Fred completed the 3-0 victory two minutes after the restart, though that was not the end of the misery for Spain, for whom Sergio Ramos missed a penalty and Gerard Piqué was sent off for bringing down Neymar as he raced through on goal. 

Earlier, in the battle for third place, an Edinson Cavani double – including a handsome free kick – proved in vain as Italy found consolation for their semi-final shootout defeat to Spain by beating Uruguay in the same manner following a pulsating 2-2 draw.

Brazil and Italy were not the only winners on the night. So, too, was everybody heading to the South American country that will host next year's FIFA World Cup™. So, if you have not already begun, start making plans to be part of the greatest event in sporting history next year.

Final rankings:

  1. Brazil
  2. Spain
  3. Italy
  4. Uruguay

*Article courtesy of FIFA.com

 
  • 68 goals

    (average 4.25 per match) were scored at the FIFA Confederations Cup Brazil 2013

All together

Brazil's players celebrate a superb FIFA Confederations Cup final victory in front of their passionate fans.

adidas Awards

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Brazilians featured heavily on the list of adidas award winners, with Neymar landing the adidas Golden Ball award as the tournament's best player and veteran goalkeeper Julio Cesar collecting the adidas Golden Glove award as the best stopper.

Beaten finalists Spain took some consolation from striker Fernando Torres earning the adidas Golden Boot award, while the team also received the FIFA Fair Play Award.

adidas Golden Ball Award: Neymar (Brazil)

Influential and eye-catching throughout the FIFA Confederations Cup fortnight, Brazilian prodigy Neymar made converts of his few remaining doubters and announced his arrival on the world stage. In addition to his goals, the young striker was a constant source of entertainment, enthralling fans with his determined runs and mazy dribbles. Exhibiting strong shooting skills with both feet, great composure in the area and an uncanny ability to deliver accurate passes to team-mates in tight spaces, the Brazilian is also the only player to have earned four FIFA Man of the Match awards, presented by Budweiser, since the beginning of the competition. He is a worthy winner of the adidas Golden Ball award.

adidas Silver Ball Award: Andres Iniesta (Spain)
adidas Bronze Ball Award: Paulinho (Brazil)

adidas Golden Boot Award: Fernando Torres (Spain)

Helped by a generous Tahiti team that allowed him to score four times, Spain's Fernando Torres landed the adidas Golden Boot award to complement the award he received as top scorer at the UEFA EURO 2012. Added to the 20 plus goals he scored in the English Premier League, it is clear that Torres retains the knack for scoring despite some commentators' belief that his powers have been on the wane of late. Torres and Fred both scored five times at the FIFA Confederations Cup, but the Spaniard landed the award courtesy of assists and minutes played.

adidas Silver Boot Award: Fred (Brazil)
adidas Bronze Boot Award: Neymar (Brazil)

adidas Golden Glove Award: Julio Cesar (Brazil)

Although Brazil's Julio Cesar had fallen out of favour at international level in recent years, Luiz Felipe Scolari handed him a recall in the months preceding the FIFA Confederations Cup. The Brazilian goalkeeper repaid his coach's confidence in style, putting in fine performances that ultimately earned him the adidas Golden Glove award for Brazil 2013. Conceding just three goals at the event, the Seleção's last line of defence consistently demonstrated a high level of concentration and an intense desire to win.

FIFA Fair Play Award: Spain

The FIFA Fair Play Award, reserved for the team best exemplifying the values of sportsmanship both on and off the field, as decided by a jury comprising members of the Local Organising Committee and the FIFA Technical Study Group, went to Spain. La Roja not only impressed with their skilful play at the FIFA Confederations Cup, but also with their sporting behaviour. This was never more evident than in the aftermath of their group-phase 10-0 victory over Tahiti. Through their post-match words and actions, the Spanish players showed great empathy and decency towards the Polynesian amateurs. They were equally generous and complimentary following their defeat by Brazil in the final. 

Best in Show

The world's very best players were on show in Brazil

10 things you need to know…

  1. The FIFA Confederations Cup Brazil 2013 is the seventh edition under this name, the first of which took place in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 1997.

  2. The FIFA Confederations Cup 2013 was Brazil's seventh consecutive participation the most of all national teams. They also won the most editions (1997, 2005, 2009 and 2013).

  3. To date 29 teams have participated in at least one edition of the FIFA Confederations Cup. In Brazil 2013 Tahiti was the only newcomer.

  4. This was the fourth edition of the FIFA Confederations Cup to be played one year before in the same host country as the FIFA World Cup™. The first was Korea/Japan 2001, followed by Germany 2005 and South Africa 2009. 

  5. Five out of the eight participating teams at the FIFA Confederations Cup 2013 were also present in the FIFA World Cup 1950™ also hosted by Brazil: Italy, Mexico, Spain, Uruguay and Brazil.

  6. Brazil 2013 was the first FIFA Confederations Cup with four representative teams that were former world champions: Uruguay, Italy, Brazil and Spain.

  7. Brazil is the fifth different confederation to host the FIFA Confederations Cup – South America. Asia has already done so four times, Europe twice, North Central America and Caribbean once and Africa once.

  8. Until this year, only previous hosts Mexico (1999) and France (2003) triumphed on home soil. Japan did, however, reach the final in 2001.

  9. All confederations have been represented at least once in a FIFA Confederations Cup final. Australia's qualification in 1997, when they were still part of the Oceania Football Confederation, was the biggest surprise.

  10. No foreign coach has ever won a FIFA Confederations Cup title. All eight winning coaches were native. Brazil's Mario Zagallo, Carlos Alberto Parreira and now 'Big' Phil Scolari have all won both the FIFA World Cup™ and the FIFA Confederations Cup as manager.