History of FIFA - British Associations return
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The year 1946 saw the return of the four British associations to FIFA. This was thanks in large part to the diplomatic talent of Jules Rimet who found in Arthur Drewry and Sir Stanley Rous farsighted partners in the English FA. Both men would head FIFA in later years.

The event was celebrated with a match between Great Britain and a 'Rest of Europe XI' played at Hampden Park, Glasgow on 10 May 1947.Billed as 'The Match of the Century' by the press, it drew a crowd of 135,000 spectators and receipts amounted to £35,000. As a sign of goodwill, this sum was placed at FlFA's disposal in order to help the governing body surmount financial difficulties brought on by the war years. The British won the game 6-1.

The first post-war FIFA World Cup™ was staged in Brazil in 1950, where the hosts lost out on the title to Uruguay. For the second time, the 'Jules Rimet Cup' was bound for Montevideo.

The start of the fifth finals in Switzerland in 1954 signalled the end of Rimet's long reign. After opening the tournament in Lausanne, the 80-year-old President confirmed his retirement at the Congress in Bern on 21 June. Rimet earned a standing ovation from his fellow delegates and, moreover, became the first Honorary President. For the last time, on 4 July, the 'Father of the World Cup' presented the captain of the victorious team, West Germany's Fritz Walter, with the 'Jules Rimet Cup'.